Modern Farmers Go From Rockers To Roots

Violet Alexander sells pumpkins she raised on her family's farm. Her parents, Ryan and Melissa, are part of a new generation of young farmers in Ohio.    COURTESY OF RYAN AND MELISSA ALEXANDER

Violet Alexander sells pumpkins she raised on her family's farm. Her parents, Ryan and Melissa, are part of a new generation of young farmers in Ohio.

COURTESY OF RYAN AND MELISSA ALEXANDER

Originally posted on wyso.org

Written by Renee Wilde

Melissa and Ryan meet through their shared love of music and traded in the rock and roll lifestyle for farm life. Now they’re raising two young daughters, along with a variety of organic crops and animals.

The change from traditional to organic farming was an idea that Ryan and his father had both shared.

"I never wanted to come back here and spray. That was the part I hated the most," says Ryan. "Anybody that’s a young farmer starting now, and even people who majored in agriculture at a university, their first job anywhere is going to be probably at a co-op mixing chemicals, or out spraying them. I don’t think that they realize the danger they're putting themselves in, as well as everybody else who's exposed to it. And that’s scary, and I think it’s going to be interesting how health plays out, not only in the food system, but in the people who are growing the food."

The farm is now a totally organic operation. Oats is one of their big crops, along with hay, sunflowers, and harvesting grass seed to resell.

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