ECONOMICS OF HAPPINESS CONFERENCE 2017

FRIDAY, OCT 20

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Explore Agraria and Discuss its Future

Friday, October 20: 8:45am-10:00am, Agraria (131 East Dayton-Yellow Springs Rd, Yellow Springs, OH)

Susan Jennings and Amy Harper

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Linking Slow Money and Land Conservation

Friday, October 20: 10:30am-11:30am, Agraria (131 East Dayton-Yellow Springs Rd, Yellow Springs, OH)

Susan Jennings, Rachel Moriarty and Krista Magaw (Executive Director, Tecumseh Land Trust)

With the average age of farmers now at 60, new farmers are needed!  But many people interested in farming don’t own farmland.  How do we support new farmers and link them to land?  Learn about three models currently in progress to make the link. Rachel Moriarty will address saving farmland and making land accessible and affordable through the Agrarian Trust and Indian Line Farm partnerships. Krista Magaw will describe the Ohio Ecological Farm and Food Association’s Begin Farming Program, and Susan Jennings will present the unique investment model and land trust partnership program being developed at Agraria. Susan will also discuss how Agraria will demonstrate restoration and production.

REGISTRATION DESK OPENS

Friday, October 20: 11:00am, Antioch Midwest Campus (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

CONFERENCE OPENING

Globalization v. Localization

Friday, October 20: 1:00pm-2:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Helena Norberg-Hodge and Jim Merkel, with Megan Bachman, moderator

WORKSHOP

Economics of Happiness

Friday, October 20: 3:00pm-5:00pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Helena Norberg-Hodge

Helena will lead a workshop to explore what localization might look like in practice. Envisioning a shift from global to local entails grappling with difficult questions, such as: How localized should we strive to be? What strategies can be employed to overcome the entrenched power of big business, big banks, and big government? She will lay out the need for “big picture activism”, a broad, holistic approach to solve problems in fields as diverse as food, health care, finance, inequality, energy, spirituality, and more.

WORKSHOP

Mutual Aid Networks and Cooperatives

Friday, October 20: 3:00pm-5:00pm, Antioch Midwest Campus, room B101 (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Stephanie Rearick and Lela Klein

This workshop explores how communities and organizers are building a new economy that works for us through models like the Mutual Aid Networks (MAN) and worker- and community-owned cooperative businesses.  Stephanie Rearick will talk about the MAN framework and how it can be used to create opportunities to do creative work, environmental regeneration, health access, transformative justice, care, and all the other essential kinds of work that we love and that makes us human.  Lela Klein will describe her work developing worker-owned businesses to fill community needs, as well as a community-based response to divestment and a food desert in Dayton, Ohio.

WORKSHOP

Social Impact Investing

Friday, October 20: 3:00pm-5:00pm, Antioch Midwest Campus, room B105 (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Tony Wells and Patrick Westerlund, Tony Wells Foundation

Tony Wells and Patrick Westerlund, of the Tony Wells Foundation, will discuss the power of social impact investing for non-profits, creating effective social and environmental benefits for the community. Their approach to creating long-lasting value for the community is to develop stronger nonprofit leaders and invest in the next generation of social innovations. 

SCREENING

Film Trailer for Saving Walden's World

Friday, October 20: 6:30pm-7:00pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Jim Merkel

The documentary film Saving Walden’s World is a search for keys to reverse climate change and avert ecological collapse. This film finds inspiration, and a radically simple solution, in three societies that have both high human development and a small ecological footprint: Cuba, Slovenia and Kerala, India. Saving Walden’s World will explore how access to education, health care, family planning, and reproductive freedom have led to advances for women in these societies, resulting in fewer children, a smaller carbon footprint and, ultimately, a more sustainable future. The film has particular relevance at a time when Americans face major setbacks in access to health care, family planning, and reproductive choice. 

Community Solutions is working with Jim to produce Saving Walden's World, and we're very excited to be able to share this trailer at the Economics of Happiness Conference.

AWARD PRESENTATION

The Arthur E. Morgan Award

Friday, October 20: 7:00pm-7:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Presented to Helena Norberg-Hodge by Jim Merkel

The Arthur Morgan award was inaugurated two years ago on the eve of Community Solutions’ 75th anniversary to honor those who are passionate about—and committed to—the virtues about which Morgan wrote so comprehensively: community, democracy, entrepreneurship, and individual character.  Each of the awardees have been exemplary in living their lives in consonance with these beliefs.

Read more information and biographies of past awardees here.

KEYNOTE

Towards an Economics of Happiness—Shifting from Corporate Rule to Genuine Sustainability and Democracy

Friday, October 20: 7:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Presented by Helena Norberg-Hodge

In this keynote address, Helena Norberg-Hodge will argue that the globalized economy is fundamentally unstable, ecologically destructive and incapable of meeting the needs of humanity. She will make the case for a shift in direction towards rebuilding local and regional economies instead. In cities and towns around the world, people are already reweaving the fabric of their communities from the bottom up, while simultaneously solving the systemic ecological problems of our time. Helena will highlight the steps that we need to take - both at the local level and internationally - to reduce the scale of our economic activity in order to put the well-being of people and the planet first.

REGISTRATION DESK CLOSES

Friday, October 20, 7:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21

REGISTRATION DESK OPENS 

Saturday, October 21: 8:00am, Antioch Midwest Campus (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

PLENARY SESSION

Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age

Saturday, October 21: 9:00am-10:30am, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Michael Shuman

The local economy movement achieved many victories, and yet has huge strides to take to make localization the dominant paradigm in communities worldwide.  Author Michael Shuman argues we need to reboot our efforts to create local business networks, to rethink economic development, and to change state and national laws governing investment, banking, procurement, and antitrust.  And we need to fundamentally change our behavior in purchasing, investing, and working.

PANEL

Innovations in Rural Revitalization in a Trump Era

Saturday, October 21: 10:30am-12:00pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Michael Shuman, Anthony Flaccavento, and Rachel Moriarty

Rachel, Anthony and Michael will share their experiences working with community-supported industries, Appalachian revitalization, and rural "pollinators" (self-financing economic development programs), respectively. They will focus on innovations revitalizing rural areas and regions through interdependence and self-reliance—creating flourishing economies.

 

LUNCH AND BOOK SIGNINGS

Saturday, October 21:  12:00pm-1:50pm, Antioch Midwest Campus (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

TOUR OF AGRARIA

Saturday, October 21: 12:50pm-1:50pm, please meet in the front lobby of Antioch Midwest Campus (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Agraria address: (131 East Dayton-Yellow Springs Rd, Yellow Springs, OH)

WORKSHOP

Local Investing

Saturday, October 21: 2:00pm-3:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Michael Shuman

Want to move your money from Wall Street to Main Street?  Michael Shuman reviews the latest tools available for investors who want to put their money into local business, for businesses who want to get financed by their customers and neighbors, and for financial professionals who want to start new local-investment institutions.

DISCUSSION

Saving Walden's World

Saturday, October 21: 2:00pm-3:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus, room B101 (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Jim Merkel

The documentary film Saving Walden’s World is a search for keys to reverse climate change and avert ecological collapse. This film finds inspiration, and a radically simple solution, in three societies that have both high human development and a small ecological footprint: Cuba, Slovenia and Kerala, India. Saving Walden’s World will explore how access to education, health care, family planning, and reproductive freedom have led to advances for women in these societies, resulting in fewer children, a smaller carbon footprint and, ultimately, a more sustainable future. The film has particular relevance at a time when Americans face major setbacks in access to health care, family planning, and reproductive choice. 

Community Solutions is working with Jim to produce Saving Walden's World, and Jim will facilitate this discussion of the film's genesis and message.

 

WORKSHOP

Rebuilding Local Food Systems

Saturday, October 21: 2:00pm-3:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus, room B105 (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Anthony Flaccavento, Sherry Chen and Amy Harper

The development of local and regional food systems that better meet the needs of farmers and eaters has been underway for some years in much of the country.  While ‘local foods’ efforts are at various stages of maturity, and while communities face different realities, a number of common issues and themes are emerging, both in terms of challenges and opportunities.  In this interactive session, participants will learn about local food initiatives emerging near Yellow Springs, Ohio, along with some core lessons learned from more than twenty years of hands-on food system work around the country.  Participants own experiences and challenges will be part of the discussion in this session.

WORKSHOP

A Reading and Conversation

Saturday, October 21: 4:00pm-5:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus Auditorium (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Charles Eisenstein

Charles and the attendees will discuss his new book. In his words, "I wish I could tell you the title of the book, but it keeps changing. When people ask what it is about, I hesitate to tell them 'climate change' even though that is the central topic, because then people think they know what it will say. But it is totally off the spectrum. Here is a tiny excerpt:

"What you will see as I deconstruct the conventional spectrum of opinion on climate change is that the dynamics of the debate obscure something more important than which side is right. As with many polarizing issues, it is the hidden assumptions, shared by both sides and questioned by neither, that are most significant and most potent in taking us into new territory."

WORKSHOP

Community Rights

Saturday, October 21: 4:00pm-5:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus, room B101 (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Tish O'Dell (Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund)

Sustainability is illegal under our current structure of law and governance. This means that the healthy, just, and vibrant environmental and economic systems so many of us envision are infeasible.

How is sustainability illegal? What does that actually mean? And – most importantly – what are we going to do about it?

It’s not enough to talk about what we long for in the places where we live. We must act. In this workshop, we explore the legal barriers that keep us from realizing what we envision for ourselves and future generations – and what nearly 200 communities are doing about it! People in municipalities across the country are a part of the growing Community Rights Movement, working to change the legal and governing structures we live under to elevate people, communities, and nature, over inequity, destruction, and profits. Working to make sustainability legal--Join us!

WORKSHOP

Community Banking and Local Currencies

Saturday, October 21: 4:00pm-5:30pm, Antioch Midwest Campus, room B105 (900 Dayton St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Brett Joseph and Rachel Moriarty

Rachel Moriarty will explore how regional currencies serve as a tool for community economic empowerment and encourage money to remain within the region, building a greater affinity between the local business community and its citizens. Dr. Brett Joseph will lead a conversation about policies and current grassroots initiatives to redirect strategic investment towards equitable community revitalization through public banking, community land trusts, and cooperatives that meet the basic human needs of nutrition, housing, education, healthcare, and safe, toxic-free environments.

REGISTRATION DESK CLOSES

Saturday, October 21: 4:00pm, Antioch Midwest Campus

KEYNOTE AND PERFORMANCES

The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible

Saturday, October 21: 7:00pm, The Foundry Theater at Antioch College (920 Corry St, Yellow Springs, OH)

Charles Eisenstein and The World House Choir

In a time of social and ecological crisis, what can we as individuals do to make the world a better place? Charles will share his thoughts on an empowering antidote to the cynicism, frustration, paralysis, and overwhelm so many of us are feeling, replacing it with a grounding reminder of what’s true: we are all connected, and our small, personal choices bear unsuspected transformational power. By fully embracing and practicing this principle of interconnectedness—called interbeing—we become more effective agents of change and have a stronger positive influence on the world.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22

POST-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Tree Identification Workshop, Followed by a Cataloging of Agraria Trees

Sunday, October 21: 9:00am-12:00pm, Agraria (131 East Dayton-Yellow Springs Rd)

Gabby Amrhein

POST-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Installing Mini-Split (Ductless) Heat Pumps

Sunday, October 22: 9:00am-12:00pm, Agraria (131 East Dayton-Yellow Springs Rd)

Linda Wigington, introduced by 2016 Conference speaker Eric Johnson

Ductless heat pump (DHP) or mini-splits are heat pumps used for heating and cooling. They are not usually connected to ductwork.  An indoor unit is connected to an outside unit via a refrigerant line, so installation can be simpler than fully ducted systems. High performance DHPs perform well in cold climates with no need for resistance heat back-up.  The back-up resistance heat is the main reason conventional air source heat pumps have not been recommended for heating dominated climates. In field tests, DHP have matched or surpassed the performance of ground-source heat pumps.  Find out how to identify better performing brands and models.  Hear about field research and insights gained with the use of DHPs in existing homes. Explore case studies to see how DHPs have been used both for the sole heating/cooling source, and also in a staged approach, in order to offset a less efficient central system. This workshop will use the Agraria farm house as a case study to examine DHP product options, and what factors to consider to determine if a ductless system is an appropriate choice for your home.